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5 free courses on tackling poverty and economic injustice

The Challenges of Global Poverty

The Challenges of Global Poverty is a free online economics course offered by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the United States. This 11-week class can be taken on its own or as a part of the MicroMasters program in Data, Economics, and Development Policy (DEDP) offered by the university. Through video lectures and assignments, the course explores various dimensions of poverty, including poverty traps, food, health, education, family, risk and insurance, credit, savings, entrepreneurship and institutions. An intensive class, the course requires roughly 12 to 14 hours of study time weekly to successfully complete all of the assigned work.

From Poverty to Prosperity: Understanding Economic Development

From Poverty to Prosperity: Understanding Economic Development is a free online economics course offered by the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Lasting for six weeks, the class includes the following modules: From Anarchy to a Centralised State; From Centralised to Inclusive States; Power, Identities and Narratives; Growth Through Urbanisation and Industrialisation; and External Influences: Trade Flows, Capital Flows, Labour Flows and International Governance Rules. At the end of the course, students complete a final assignment and have an opportunity to participate in a live online question and answer session with the instructor. Most students will need to devote two to three hours to the course each week.

Poverty & Population: How Demographics Shape Policy

Poverty & Population: How Demographics Shape Policy is a free online social sciences course offered by Columbia University. The purpose of the class is to give students a thorough understanding of social welfare systems. Taught over a four-week period through online videos, the class includes the following modules: Populations, Income, Poverty and Policy; Causes of Poverty and Discrimination; Gender, Race and Oppression and; Formulating Social Policy in the U.S. Students have the option to take this course on its own or as a part of a social sciences sequence offered by the university. Most students will need to spend four hours on the course each week.

Economic Growth and Distributive Justice Part I -The Role of the State

Economic Growth and Distributive Justice Part I -The Role of the State is a free online economics course offered by Tel Aviv University in Israel. This class seeks to help students understand why the State is necessary to ensure the welfare of citizens. Split into four modules designed to be completed over a four-week period, the class includes the following modules: What do we need a state for?; The Relationship between Efficiency and Distributive Justice; Demonstrating the Implications Of Different Ethical Theories; and Distributive Justice: Measurement and Implications. After completing the course, students will be ready to enroll in the second part: Economic Growth and Distributive Justice Part II – Maximize Social Wellbeing.

Economic Growth and Distributive Justice Part II – Maximize Social Wellbeing

Economic Growth and Distributive Justice Part II – Maximize Social Wellbeing is a free online economics course offered by Tel Aviv University in Israel. The class is intended to be taken after its sister class, Economic Growth and Distributive Justice Part I -The Role of the State. During the five-week class, students will gain a deeper understanding of social welfare programs. The class consists of five modules: The Excess Burden of Taxation; Tax Incidence: Who Bears the Economic Burden of a Tax?; Progressivity: Definition and Ways to Achieve; Low Income, Low Ability and the Optimal Income Tax Model; and Designing the Tax and Transfer System that Maximizes Social Wellbeing.

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